Global Equation Attributes
Width=""   Class=""   Style=""
Apply Math Italics?   Yes   No
Pad =, >, <, ≥ and ≤?   Yes   No
Equation Number Location:   Left   Right  
Suppress Formatting Whitespace?   Yes   No
HTML with equation markup text

Supported Syntax for the HTML Equation Preproscessor

You can denote an equation with the <eq> tag. This tag must be closed with a </eq>. The <eq> tag has two special attributes:  num and eqalign.

<eq num="num"> labels the equation with equation number num. The equation number doesn't have to be numeric. In fact, something like <eq num="(5)"> would be more typical. The num attribute is optional.

<eq eqalign="char"> sets the align character for a multiline equation array. The align character char can be a string. For example, <eq align="&ge;"> would be perfectly valid and would align on the ≥. The eqalign attribute is optional.

The <eq> tag corresponds directly to a <table> tag in the table for the equation. Any other attributes of the <eq> tag are passed directly to the <table> tag.

Inside the <eq></eq>, you may use the <er> tag. This tag must be closed with a </er>. You do not need to have any <er> tags in your <eq> block. If you have data in your <eq> block that is not enclosed with <er> tags, then it will be treated as though it were enclosed with the minimal number of tags. For example, <eq>data1<er>data2</er>data3</eq> is equivalent to <eq><er>data1</er><er>data2</er><er>data3</er></eq>. The <er> tag has two special attributes:  num and eqalign.

<er num="num"> labels the equation row with equation number num. This attribute is ignored if the num attribute is used in the <eq> tag. The num attribute is optional.

<er eqalign="char"> sets the alignment character for that row. This setting overrides the assignment in the <eq> tag. Since the alignment characters (or strings) may be different in different rows, you need to know that the left sides are aligned. The eqalign attribute is optional.

The <er> tag corresponds directly to a <tr> tag in the table for the equation. Any other attributes of the <er> tag are passed on to the <tr> tag.

Inside the <er></er>, you may use the <ed> tag. (You may also use the <ed> tag where the <er></er> is omitted, but implied.) This tag must be closed with a </ed>. If you have data in your <er> block that is not enclosed with <ed> tags, then it will be treated as though it were enclosed with the minimal number of tags.

Each <ed> tag corresponds directly to a <td> tag. It may also correspond indirectly to other <td> tags. (This is becuase additional <td> tags may be created to implement the eqalign feature or <frac><bar></frac> blocks. There are are two known uses for the <ed> tag. One is to force a change in the way that the HTML is formatted, so that it is easier to make manual changes. The other is to pass attributes to the resulting <td> tag and any additional <td> tags that are created within the <ed></ed> block. The attributes are applied to the innermost <td> tags. (There may be additional tables inside the overall table for the equation. For example, the entire left side of the equation may be a table inside a <td> tag of the overall table.)

Inside the <ed></ed>, you may use the <frac> tag to create a fraction. (You may also use the <frac> tag where the <ed></ed> is omitted, but implied.) This tag must be closed with a </frac>, and there must be an intervening <bar> tag. At this time, you may not nest <frac><bar></frac> blocks.

Each <frac> tag corresponds directly to a <td> tag. Any attributes will be passed to the <td> tag. Any attributes which are specified in the <ed> tag will also be passed, unless they are overridden by the same attribute specified in the <frac> tag. (Note: This is partially implemented. The attributes of the <ed> tag are passed and come after the arguments of the <frac> tag, but there is no check to see if attributes are duplicated.)

Inside the <er></er>, you may include an <eqalign> tag. This specifies the location of the alignment for that equation row. The <eqalign> tag overrides any specification from an eqalign attribute of an enclosing tag. (Note: The <eqalign> tag is not yet supported.)

The preprocessor now supports the <mi> tag outside of block equations. That is, you can't use <mi> inside <eq></eq>. This is very useful for putting inline math into roman font with italicized letters. The <mi> tag must be closed with a corresponding </mi> tag.

At this time, there is no way to turn off math italics for a few characters inside an equation. When I need to do that, I edit the HTML by hand afterward. I'm considering creating a <t> or <rm> tag for that purpose.

Valid HTML 4.01! Steve Schaefer
Last modified: Date: 2003/02/05